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"Wig! It's not just a way of life, it's an explosive reaction against the tension of living in an insane century."

Up date!!! New Tour Dates Posted!! May 20th etc… Click on Tours!

Posted by PC on 12 May 2016 | 1 response

Hi gang… hello! Hello. HELLO! Is anybody there? All the traffic went to Facebook, gee, I sort of regret that.

Anyhow, a new tour back east is coming in a few days. Also McCabe’s on June 19, a Novato cookout with KC Turner and Dan Bern, and in October…. A Thirty Year Anniversary Release of My first solo LP, coming on Omnivore!

There will be song class in SF and Palo Alto this summer, tho’ its still being scheduled at this point.

Outside of that, trying to come up with my next move… how about you?

best wishes,
PC

Two Day Songwriting Workshop In Palo Alto, April 9 & April 23!

Posted by PC on 2 April 2016 | No responses

Peter Case – Two Session Songwriter’s Workshop
PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A TWO DAY WORKSHOP
WHEN
Sat, April 9, 2016
1:30 am-Sat, April 23, 2016
1:30 pm
$150
WHO
Peter Case is a Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter and producer, a mighty fine guitarist and a well-reviewed published author and yet, he’s most at home on the stage. For 25 years, Peter, his guitar and his songs have mesmerized audiences
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PLEASE NOTE: This is a two day workshop on April 9th and 23rd from 1:30 to 4:30.

A class that all levels of songwriters can enjoy. Peter brings knowledge from his years as an acclaimed songwriter, including his debut in 1976 with punk/new wave/ rock and roll legends The Nerves and his popular recordings with the Plimsouls for Geffen Records, on through to his groundbreaking and three-times Grammy nominated solo career.
In this 2-session workshop, Peter offers secrets of the craft that will have you immediately writing more powerful and interesting songs. The atmosphere is a fun, comfortable, and at times humorous environment, but the content is serious and will enable you to surprise yourself with a new song composed as a class assignment. You can receive feedback in the second class for your assignment song. Performance of songs is completely voluntary, not required. Peter’s workshop will focus equally on lyrics and music, and on the art of coming up with fresh ideas. Topics will include “thinking like a genius” and “putting what you love directly into your songs.”
Sign up early and get a song assignment for the first class, too.
There will also be time for Q&A and help with individual issues that participants may be having.
$150.00

http://www.gryphonstrings.com/events/

Songwriter’s Workshop Sails Monday Night April 4 in SF!

Posted by PC on 2 April 2016 | No responses

Songwriters Workshop with Peter Case
Mon 7-10 pm; Peter Case 4/4-5/9 sw.pc
In this class that all levels of songwriters will enjoy, Peter brings knowledge from his years as an acclaimed songwriter, including his debut in 1976 with punk/new wave/rock-and-roll legends The Nerves and his popular recordings with the Plimsouls for Geffen Records, through to his groundbreaking and three­-time Grammy-­nominated solo career. In this workshop, Case offers secrets of the craft that will have you immediately writing more powerful and interesting songs. The atmosphere is fun, comfortable, and at times humorous, but the content is serious and will enable you to surprise yourself with a new batch of songs composed in weekly assignments. The workshop will focus equally on lyrics and music, and on the art of coming up with fresh ideas. Topics include “thinking like a genius” and “putting what you love directly into your songs.” Sign up early and get a song assignment for the first class!
Cost 425.00

http://bluebearmusic.org/blue-bear-programs/adult-music-classes/instruments/creating-music/

A Street Singer’s Christmas

Posted by PC on 24 December 2015 | 6 responses

The year wound out magnificently, days dropping off like chunks of liquor store ice, into the big muddy river of time, drifting away and melting in the raging currents of the holiday season.

I was down at Market and Powell wearing ragged winter hand-me-downs, looking for a place to set my case amidst the streaming current of xmas shoppers pushing and stomping their way to the next shop, for the next item on their list, past the ringing salvation army trio, and the finger pointing psycho preacher at the cable car turn around.

“You! Will! Burrrrrnnnnn!” he screamed, looking right at me. I looked away and kept walking. Same to you, pal, fuck off.

It was cold out, wet, not raining anymore, though it was pouring an hour before. The sky was already getting dark and the day had just begun. Nice! I was alone, and had exactly 25 cents left from yesterday’s busk session. I didn’t know where Danny’d been lately, hadn’t seen him since he took off to Hayward with Nicole. He’d been gone about a week. Bert’d been scarce lately as well; he’d been somewhere with his Swedish girl, and I didn’t know where or how he was making it, either.

I hadn’t eaten for a day. Something had to happen. I turned right up Powell and walked as fast as I could up to Union Square, set down my case at the entrance to the square, on the corner, and started singing and playing Sleepy John Estes’, “Broke and Hungry,” bangin’ the snaky riff over and over on my Yamaki deluxe.

A few people tossed quarters as they hurried past, and two winos, who were sitting on a wall farther back in the park, looked up, did a slow double take, then ambled my way. They’d been sharing a bottle of Night Train Express, but it was all gone now. Ahhhh, Night Train: The cheap wine with the beautifully drawn locomotive blazing down a midnight rail on the label. They looked like they’d be glad to get their hands on a quarter or two.

My fingers were cramped from pressing down the metal strings in the cold, the case was open and bare, the little bit of change I’d made so far could buy me a pork bun over in Chinatown, so I considered quitting and making the long trudge through the Stockton tunnel over to North Beach, when here comes John.

John was an old time hippie from up in the Haight. I knew him from around town; he’d been there since before the ‘67 boom. John had long dirty blonde hair and big ragged side burns. He was wearing a black stove pipe hat, an old fashioned long coat with tails—to protect him from the chill, jeans with piebald patches, and big worn out work boots. He was hauling a trumpet case that day, though I’d always thought of him as a guitar player. We greeted each other in the gloom of the fading afternoon.

“Hey Peter, what’s goin’ on, man? How you doin’ out here? Where’s Danny? You feel like sittin’ in?” He glanced in my empty case and got the picture. “Today should be a great day out here, man. Let’s team up and go over to the cable car turn around; we’ll be shoveling it in down there.”

I was glad to have a partner, so I picked up and we worked our way through the crowd, back down the couple of blocks, to the red bricks at Market.

“Look, Pete, here’s the thing out here: you can’t play what you want to hear. You gotta play the song you hate the most. Name a song you hate, one you really can’t stand.”

I didn’t answer immediately, and so he went on: “You hate ‘Alley Cat,’don’t you? Most guys hate that one.”

I thought of the cornball Al Hirt standard: “Yeah, I can’t stand that.”

“Good,” he said. “Play along with me and watch this.”

We started playing Hirt’s cloying, cheesy hit. John took the lead clumsily on the trumpet, and me, I did my best to back it with the proper orchestral chords.

We hadn’t been at it for 15 seconds when a passing woman shopper threw a handful of change in the box. A man doubled back and put a dollar bill in the case. A small crowd started to gather. Some tourists took our picture, then came forward and put a twenty in the case. WOW! John stopped blowing horn for a second, and reached the sawbuck out of there and into his pocket for safe keeping.

We made 33 dollars in the first 15 minutes.

“The secret, man, is, you gotta play the song you hate the most. That’s the one that makes the money. Let’s keep playing ‘Alley Cat.’ You gotta keep goin’, past where you’re sick to death of it. Just keep goin’. Trust me.”

I decided to believe him, and we kept playing and playing and playing ‘til I thought I was gonna lose my mind, that my fingers were gonna freeze and break. The money was FLYING into our case. It was the highest paying session I’d seen out there. .

We played ’til the traffic died, until the second-to-last-shopping-day-before-Christmas was over, and, when we finally packed up, we each pocketed nearly a hundred bucks—by far the best day I’d ever had busking.

We ran into Crazy Horse Danny just as we were closing up shop; he’d come back in the city, he’d come down here looking for me, and he played ten minutes or so of “Alley Cat” with us, so he could make some dough too, and then we packed it up, and caught the N Judah streetcar up to the Haight , getting off after the tunnel, across from John’s Carl Street pad. We decided to celebrate for a while, first stopping at a liquor store, to get some supplies.

Once we got to John’s we all went into his music room at the front of the house, sat around the piano with the little Christmas tree on top, and for the rest of the night, we sang the songs we loved.

No Depression year end poll

Posted by PC on 16 December 2015 | Comments Off

I was told I could probably use a little bit of a goose in the No Depression year-end readers’ poll.

Here’s the link:

http://nodepression.com/2015-readers-poll?page=2

Kickstarter Campaign

Posted by PC on 21 October 2015 | 2 responses

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1768221541/hwy-62-publicity-campaign

hey folks, this is the HWY 62 Kickstarter I was a talking about. The album is done, recorded in LA with Ben Harper on lead guitar, DJ Bonebrake from X on drums, as well as some other great musicians, ten songs about now, I’m really proud of it, and I want people to hear it! It’s being released Oct 30.This kickstarter is to raise funds for a PR campaign that will steer music fans to the record, and let my fans know it’s out. Your support is super appreciated. The record companies don’t do this stuff anymore, but it still needs to get done! Thanks for your support!

hey folks, this is the HWY 62 Kickstarter I was a talking about. The album is done, recorded in LA with Ben Harper on lead guitar, DJ Bonebrake from X on drums, as well as some other great musicians, ten songs about now, I’m really proud of it, and I want people to hear it! It’s being released Oct 30.This kickstarter is to raise funds for a PR campaign that will steer music fans to the record, and let my fans know it’s out. Your support is super appreciated. The record companies don’t do this stuff anymore, but it still needs to get done! Thanks for your support!

HWY 62 Publicity Campaign Kickstarter

Posted by PC on 21 October 2015 | Comments Off

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1768221541/hwy-62-publicity-campaign

thirty off the top of my head ( X 6)

Posted by PC on 4 October 2015 | 19 responses

this kind of list is sort of a internet meme these days, so, here’s my list of thirty acts (actually 180) that I’ve shared a bill or stage with, or in couple of cases, collaborated on songs with. the only one i’m not sure of is suicide, paul collins said it happened, but I was pretty spaced out those nights at max’s kanas city, so don’t actually recall??? )

1) john lee hooker
2) merle haggard
3) john prine
4) townes van zandt
5 bobby womack
6) willie dixon
7) de la soul
8) the ramones
9) tom petty & the heartbreakers
10) jonathan richman
11) los lobos
12) eric von schmidt
13) gordon lightfoot
14) dave van ronk
15) donovan
16) odetta
17) elizabeth cotton
18) ali farke toure
19) elvis costello & the attractions
20) tarafs de haidouk (romanian gypsy band)
21) ruben blades
22) spalding gray
23) gary us bonds
24) devo
25) pere ubu
26) the gap band
27) mavis staples
28) the replacements
29) ice-t
30) allen ginsberg

31) flamin groovies
32) fleshtones
33) mink de ville
34) nick lowe
35) husker du
36) the zeros
37) the alley cats
38) the last
39) the dils
40) joan jett & the black hearts
41) madness
42) blue oyster cult
43) the buzzcocks
44) the blasters (also, dave & phil alvin)
45) richard thompson
46) the outlaws
47) steve forbert
48) jackson browne
49) john doe
50) joe ely
51) guy clark
52) the desert rose band (chris hillman, herb pederson)
53) chuck d
54) jeffrey lee pierce
55) taj mahal
56) the coasters
57) doug sahm
58) t-bone burnett
59) john hammond, jr.
60) loudon wainwright

61) lucinda williams
62) van dyke parks
63) sir george martin
64) the la philharmonic
65) ramblin jack elliot
66) john stewart
67) bob neuwirth
68) james harmon band w/ hollywood fats
69) the nuns
70) dmz (mono man, future lyres)
71) roger mcguinn
72) suicide (max’s, according to paul c)
73) the standells
74) stevie winwood
75) ron sexsmith
76) chris smither
77) ian hunter & mick ronson
78) the ventures
79) butch hancock
80) emmylou harris
81) daniel lanois
82) cheap trick
83) richie havens
84) the plugz
85) sammy hagar
86) graham parker
87) stan ridgway
88) billy barty
89) bodeans
90) bonnie raitt

91) ray wylie hubbard
92) paul weller
93) iggy pop (andy kershaw radio show, london)
94) steve earle
95) phil lynott (jam)
96) rem (jam in denver, peter buck, many jams etc))
97) dream syndicate (on live lp)
98) herbie hancock
99) dwight yoakum
100) johnny winter
101) ladysmith black mombazo
102) alex chilton
103) eddie money
104) eurythmics
105) exene cervenka
106) dwight twilley
107) phil seymour
108) chrissie hynde
109) david johanson
110) the tubes; also, pierced arrows
111) tex & the horseheads
112) hoodoo gurus
113) suicide commandos
114) firehose
115) jimmy sons ( jam, ex-shadows of knight)
116) rubber city rebels
117) johnny depp (miami, 1981)
118) marshall crenshaw
119) kathi mcdonald (great sf singer, stones exile lp)
120) beausoleil

121) alejandro escovedo
122) freedie johnson
123) jim lauderdale
124) rosie flores
125) billy joe shaver
126) billy swan
127) steve young
128) phranc
129) crawdaddies
130) go go’s
131) eric taylor
132) garland jeffries
133) bruce langhorne
134) duane jarvis
135) peter paul & mary
136) the romantics; & don’t neglect the Timbuk 3
137) the adolescents
138) the weirdos
139) rich little
140) harry dean stanton
141) the king bees
142) carla olson and the textones
143) buddy miles
144) johnny otis
145) rodney crowell
146) allen toussaint
147) zolar x
148) david lindley
149) mary gauthier
150) south side johnny (songwriting)

151) kevin welch & kieran kane
152) michael westin king
153) victoria williams
154) john hiatt
155) robyn hitchcock
156) the williams brothers
157) marvin etzioni
158) peter stamfel
159) mary lou lord
160) jules shear
161) sheiks of shake
162) phast phreddie & thee precisions
163) direct hits (paula pierce)
164) lee flier, what the…?
165) ted hawkins
166) baby lemonade
167) bill morrissey
168) peter mulvey
169) keith sykes
170) roseanne cash
172) jim whitford, mark winsick, rob lynch!
173) ron franklin
174) paul geremia
175) five blind boys of alabama
176) chuck prophet & stephanie finch
177) jim page
178) thelonius monster also: flea, keith morris, & fishbone.
179) cindy lee berryhill
180) brave combo

& many more acts much more than deserving of mention, but whose names are lost to me
for the time being, in the airwaves of my brain. for example, the nerves, the plimsouls eric idle and duke mcvinnie! (see, gotta make another list)

Willie Dixon style

Posted by PC on 28 August 2015 | 1 response

I met and collaborated with the absolutely great Willie Dixon–a thrill!–when his songs were administered by Bug Music—he listened to one of my piano demos over at the Bug office, and had me over to work at his house in Glendale, a little cottage really, a very small place for such a definitive musical giant; his publishing suit against Led Zeppelin for “Whole Lotta Love” hadn’t been decided yet; when it was some said he would be compensated in the millions.

He reclined in a large leather upholstered chair in his office,leaning back and peering through bifocals, scratching away at lyrics in pencil on a little pad, with one leg swung up over the armrest, and the other foot firmly on the floor. A parlor grand piano was situated in the middle of the adjacent room, by the front door, in sight of his armchair and he’d ask me to sit down at the keys and pound out infinite repetitions of the two-handed blues groove to the song while he composed lyrics, all based on rhymes for smoke. We’d do that for a spell, then I’d come in and we’d discuss music and life.

“Everybody’s got to have their own style” he intoned with the voice of a mystic. “Sometimes the name of the style, the song, and the artist are all the same thing–identical–Bo Diddley. When I first met Chuck Berry he didn’t have a style. One afternoon he came in playing the old country and western song Ida Red, but he had it going a new way, and I told him ‘keep doing that so you don’t forget it while I set up the microphones; and that was Maybelline.”

“You gotta have your own style—,” he starts rummaging over the articles atop a shelf in the back of the office— “I got a style over here for somebody,“ and he comes up with two harmonicas, silver in his huge grip, handing one to me and commanding to just “play.” He assumed I could, so I did, playing a blues in cross-harp, what they call “second position,” the key of G on a C harp, while he lifts the other harmonica up to his mouth and starts wailing a strange lick, very eerie and keening.
It was the first I’d ever seen or heard of a minor harmonica.
“Major against minor,” he explained, “that’s a style for somebody.”

Woody Guthrie Festival in Okemah!

Posted by PC on 8 July 2015 | Comments Off

http://www.woodyguthrie.com/artists.html

I’m playing Saturday, July 11.

Check out the great line-up!

Here’s something I wrote about Woody Guthrie for a French magazine a couple years back:

Woody Guthrie

Woody Guthrie, the travellers friend, the truth teller, a hard hitter. The original poet with a guitar. He wasn’t famous in his time, only great. He lived the life of an unknown. The real rolling stone. His was the voice of America’s downside, outlaws, bums, hobos and other outcasts: therefore an incubator of ‘the other side of this life’ and the father, along with the Beats, of the counter culture and punk rock.

Woody was a rocker. Tracks like ‘Dead or Alive’ ‘Stewball’ ‘Lost Train Blues’ are all pure rock and roll, before that word was even coined. Stewball sounds and the walls come down, a one chord wailing jam, with a group made of Woody, Leadbelly, Cisco Houston, and Sonny Terry. This bunch of madman performed on some recordings called ‘The Stinson Sessions’ and I recommend you find it.

That’s some of my favorite Woody, hearing him collaborate with his pals. A true lonesome hearted outlaw rock and roll poet, and he hated lawyers, too, what bad can you say about a man like that?

The first time I really heard Woody’s songs, was when I was sixteen, on a hitch hiking trip on the East Coast during the winter of 1970-71. I’d gone a few hundred miles the day before, thumbing from Syracuse to Albany, where I got dropped off by an on-ramp to the highway. A light snow started to fall as I stepped up to the road and tried flagging another ride. The local drivers passed me by for hours, and the snowfall picked up. Finally, no ride, the sun went down, and a blizzard hit, snow falling so hard fast I could hardly see 10 paces Still no ride so I gave up and took a bus into town, feeling lonely as a clod and forsaken by my fellows. I found a place to crash in town, at a shelter for the homeless run by a church. The next morning they turned us out, and the world was covered in snow and ice. On my way to the edge of town I went by a little old public library in a decrepit brick building. I ducked in there to get warm for a minute before hitting the road again. They had a record area in back, a collection of old albums, and a little listening booth. I rifled through the records and picked out a Skip James lp, and an album of the songs of Woody Guthrie. I was stranded, hundreds of miles from home, lonesome, just about broke, felt like I was on fire, and it was just about the perfect way to dig Woody. He hit me hard and I never forgot it.